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Ten Solutions to Poverty


Somalia’s famine brings issues of global poverty to the forefront

Prachi Kamble, Staff Writer

The recent famine in Somalia brought the fate of eighty percent of the world’s population to the spotlight. With catastrophic events such as this famine, poverty resurfaces yet again in the global consciousness. A consciousness that is mostly preoccupied with the rapid advances of its more exciting urban economies. Questions are then raised on the prevalent quality of poverty and the horrors of its consequences.

The causes of poverty are manifold. War, disease, famine and unemployment being the big players. What steps can then be taken towards addressing the massive social issue of global poverty that has afflicted humanity for centuries?

1. Employment generation

Carefully and extensively planned employment programs funded by the government can spur growth in jobs. Industries requiring substantial labour forces can also be given significantly larger aid from the government. Focus should be placed on developing companies that offer sustainable and long-term jobs to the community. Companies should also budget sufficiently for employee training and related community programs, so that employees and prospective employees can keep their skills relevant and up-to-date.

2. Drawing on various social institutions to fund poverty fighting programs e.g. charities, research institutions, U.N. , non-profit organizations, universities.

Money funnelled from every organization available adds up to powerful sums that can produce tangible change. When organizations develop an interest, albeit vested, they tend to be more strongly motivated. Organizations that have a concrete goal to achieve with strict project plans are able to efficiently concentrate their efforts into producing change. For this reason charities with numerous middlemen organizations should be discouraged to ensure money reaches those in need. Importance should be given to organizations that follow the teach a man to fish ideology rather than the give the man a fish one, unless in extremely dire emergency circumstances.

3. Transparency in government spending

Where and how a government chooses to spend taxpayers’ money and its own revenue should be visible to the media and the common man. This makes governments accountable for their actions and inaction becomes easier to pinpoint and address. It also discourages corruption in government systems. For example, transparency will be especially beneficial to civilians whose government might be allotting money to its nuclear weapons program instead of to its poverty programs.


4. Cancelling impossible to repay world debts

Many developing countries are trapped in the cycle of constantly repaying debts that are impossible to pay off. This ensures that they never get a chance to develop and become self-sufficient. The priorities of these countries are therefore unnecessarily skewed and the citizens of these debt-ridden nations are devoid of any hope for a better future.

5. Prioritizing programs that target fundamental human rights

Every individual should have access to housing, food, clean water, healthcare and electricity. Technically governments should only move on to other projects after they have made sure that programs that provide these basic amenities to their people are up and running. This might prove to be the hardest step yet.

  • Andrew

    many of these suggestions are with good intentions but lack the depth of understanding of how the world economy operates. unfortunately, with globalization it means that money (and opportunities) move a lot more faster, with respect to the size of the profit margin. 

    many have been championing the “tax the rich and feed the poor” campaign, such as billionaire Warren Buffett. Berkshire stands to gain most from such a policy as Berkshire sells insurance policy to cover inheritance tax and other high networth taxes. many wealthy individuals operate offshore trusts and foundations which operate in their interests. despite the swiss banking system bowing down to US demands for surrendering up its accounts, there exists many tax havens: State of Delaware, Bahamas, etc. Another blow to the “tax-the-rich” policy is that taxing US millionaires at 50% – even with anti-loophole regulation – would only reduce the deficit by 8% and the US national debt by 1% (Source: Tax Foundation). If the study of philanthropy and art history has anything to show, it is that wealthy patrons are the driving force behind improving standards of living: only they have the resources to start new industries, jumpstart a dormant business and donate money for education. simply legislating that someone’s hardearned cash to be given to someone else is forcing the hand of a possible class war.on the macroscale, the article focus on debt-ridden developing countries. understanding how the global economy works is important in alleviating the human equity level in countries where famine and disease is rampant. funds that aid such countries in need typically increase in size when developed nation have a trade surplus. with the US and the EU facing a severe deficit problem and the world economy slowing in terms of growth, there will be severe challenges in solving the poverty problem through financing alone.

    However, the author does highlight several suggestions which goes into heart of improving societies and economies from the inside out: improved education, health systems may eventually lead to more enlightened governments in these countries of need. 

    • Fernando Arce21

      I agree that the way to solve poverty cannot be encompassed in one page….or 10 or 20…I also agree that education and health are among the first things (if not the first) that people must have access to in order to have a better life…now..how do we do that? I wrote an article with my own suggestions (with verifiable research as well), and that should be coming out soon so look out for that – I’d love to hear your opinions.  But for the time being, I will leave with one comment of my own in regards to something you said: “If the study of philanthropy and art history has anything to show, it is that wealthy patrons are the driving force behind improving standards of living: only they have the resources to start new industries, jumpstart a dormant business and donate money for education. simply legislating that someone’s hardearned cash to be given to someone else is forcing the hand of a possible class war”…

      There are a few things I disagree with, but I’ll try to be brief and focused.  It has not only been wealthy patrons that have been the engine of progress: history has also shown that for the most part it has been intellectuals and academics; poets; writers; and other such type of thinkers that have imbued society with the seeds needed to achieve change and progress.  That wealthy patrons have the resources is true, but they are certainly not the main engine of change/progress – if anything, they’ve exhausted those resources trying to maintain the status quo and funding those who repress the academics vying for change. Also, it is precisely because the wealthy patrons are actually the ones who do own the resources that can facilitate and foment change (to start new industries; to jumpstart dormant businesses; to donate money for education), that poverty continues to run amok, even in industrialized nations! those resources needed to foment change must be shared not controlled by a few people.  If those resources are indeed needed for change, then it seems entirely conterintuitive to let a few people monopolize them and subject the large majority to the whims of those ‘owners’. Policy is neeeded to change that….policy is needed to either convince people that the resources must be made available to all so that we may all have a say in the raising of our own living standards, not just the ‘owners’. And no, we don’t need to simply take the money from the rich and give it to the poor…change has to be enacted gradually, but it must be done with integrity and if need be with an unmmovable heart.  In certain places in latin america the answer is  not to simply give money to the poor: it is to use that money to create industries and to provide the poor with jobs and with microcredit so that they may erect themselves to be economic agents ready to enter the Free Market with their own resources, not just with labor to be sold cheaply to the ‘owner’…. ohhh and i almost forgot: the rich are the ones that can donate money for education? they don’t need us educated..but that’s a different argument: what i really wanted to say was that another root of the problem is that many have grown to see educationa s a privilege – as soemthing that rich people should donate money to out of the kindness of their heart. No, in my opinion education is an indelible right just as health and just our human rights…it is the core of our being and of progress.

      • johnny

        your anti-capitalist argument almost becomes contradicting… “policy is needed to either convince people that the resources must be made available to all so that we may all have a say in the raising of our own living standards, not just the ‘owners’. And no, we don’t need to simply take the money from the rich and give it to the poor…change has to be enacted gradually, but it must be done with integrity and if need be with an unmmovable heart. In certain places in latin america the answer is not to simply give money to the poor: it is to use that money to create industries and to provide the poor with jobs and with microcredit so that they may erect themselves to be economic agents ready to enter the Free Market with their own resources, not just with labor to be sold cheaply to the ‘owner’”….Whether or not you take out the business owners there will still be an elitist group running the country expanding executive power in the white house(Obama’s administration ). Wouldn’t you rather like the opportunity to become so successful than never having a shot. Be careful with your terminology. Who creates the businesses? Because it is not a “free market” if the government creates the industry. This country became known as the land of opportunity, power, and wealth due to free innovation and rugged individualism which happened to be a result of colonialism.

  • Anonymous

    There’s also the problem of peak oil.

  • Lagarconne Moderne

    Science and technology-based solutions only can help fight poverty in
    the world’s poorest nations, says an NGO that has taken precisely this
    approach to tackle the problem in India.

    The India800 Foundation, a charity that will present its work at the
    House of Lords Monday, argues poverty should be tackled by identifying
    specific problems and then by developing technology-based solutions.

    “Our theme is Building One India, and our work is always
    solutions-focused,” said Krishna Sarda, India800′s chief executive, in a
    statement Thursday.

    The organisation was launched jointly by the Indo-British All Party Parliamentary Group and EMF, a Social Justice Foundation.

    http://www.lagarconne.com/inhouseprojects/
     

  • Kids Designer Clothing

    This coming year Pope Benedict is going to spend time teaching matters of Justice. In fact, he’s called for a new emphasis on Justice several times in the past year. St John’s University is a college operated by the Congregation of the Mission (the Vincentians), the religious order founded by the great Saint Vincent de Paul who had a special love for the poor and marginalized but also taught that one can’t effectively serve the poor without an intimate relationship with Jesus Christ. For Saint Vincent de Paul, in order to walk with the poor one had to first first walk with the Lord. To that end, the Vincentian Fathers, Brothers and laity organized the Vincentian Center for Church and Society.

     
    http://www.monpetitbijou.com/

  • tanyawalker

    STOP POVERTY

  • mikera

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  • ROSE

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  • gerald

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  • dominique

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  • tanya

    hey every one i live in a box

    • sarah hassoun

      hahaha

  • brexxie

    dat was cul

  • Guest

    stop poverty please. Thank you for the article it helped me a lot with my work I am doing

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