The Rise of Cities | Arbitrage Magazine | Vol. 5, No. 5
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The Rise of Cities | Arbitrage Magazine | Vol. 5, No. 5


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I live in a city with many outlying areas and I often feel like they blend together as one single city. At the same time, they each operate under their own government and also take rulings from the provincial and federal government.

As our world grows, more cities are taking control of their own policies, laws and how they maintain their municipality. This allows them to make decisions that are better for the people who live in them. They have also pulled away from the nation they are found in and formed their own autonomous government. These cities have become what are known as city-states.

It is interesting to note however, only three city-states that function as their own nation currently exist. But there are some cities I think we can all agree are reaching that status even though they are still under the power of a federal government. From Toronto and New York, to Tokyo and Moscow, the big cities are often becoming better known than the countries they reside in.

In this issue, we’ll be taking a look at what makes a city-state and the types there are, as well as how these sovereign cities could change how our society works. We then detail whether the rise of these cities are encroaching on rural farming and it’s change to urban way of farming.

We take a look into the business world of pop-up shops, we highlight how the Internet affects democracy and in the science and technology world, we examine the interesting proposition of taking a vacation, albeit a permanent one, to Mars and we also examine youth entering the entrepreneur world.

Finally, this issue looks at the topic of helping people find jobs, Belarus’s attempt at energy sovereignty and as a treat, we present to you our interviews with James Cameron, Alex Trebek and base-jumper Felix Baumgartner at the 125th Anniversary Gala for National Geographic.

Editor-in-chief
Sean Previl